Process Organisation in Project Management

Project Fundamentals

Project management is an extensive process that entails the incorporation of general system theory, as far as management of resources. A project is defined as a temporary undertaking that is meant to create a unique product or service with the aim of achieving the best result. An important aspect of any project is coordination and establishment of controls implying the start and end dates should be set up in advance. The planner should be aware of the time constraints, available resources, and the costs associated with the project. Any task in the project entails fulfilment of major organisational goals and objectives, but the timeframe has to be specific (Craig 2002, p. 89).

In many cases, an individual might be quick to put in place a project, but ending it has always been problematic. Analysts observe that a project without clear goals and objectives is not valid. Project development is a continuous process meaning a definite plan has to be put in place. Again, a project might consist of one person or a group, while its duration might be less than an hour. For any project to be accomplished, the implementers should have specific skills and abilities. Effective managers of projects should be knowledgeable and highly skilful. In this regard, competence is a valuable resource in the sense that the manager has to develop special tactics in implementing the project (Hoffer 2002, p. 29).

Project Management Tools and Techniques

Management of any project is always a challenge for many managers because it includes many responsibilities. Based on this, various tools and techniques are employed in realising the major aims and objectives of the projects. Some tools and techniques require the use of computer software, whereas others are applied manually (Friedlein 2001, p. 34). Since projects differ, the manager has to identify the one that best suits the project. One of the highly reliable tools is Program Evaluation Review Technique (PERT) while the other is the Gant Chart. The two tools can be applied either manually or with the use of the software. PERT is mostly utilised when planning and controlling a project.

Managing People

Employees are an important resource in the attainment of organisational goals and objectives. Without effective workers, the organisation might not be able to offer quality services to clients. In this regard, the management has to ensure that recruited individuals are highly experienced and talented. According to Abraham Maslow, motivating members of the staff boosts their morale, which suggests that an effective reward system has to be put in place if the management is to accomplish the mission and the objectives of any project (Hartman & Ashrafi 2002, p. 14). For instance, each organisational member has to be involved in designing and implementing the project. The head of the project should employ democratic leadership styles, as this is known to motivate workers. The manager should be concerned with the interests and the desires of workers instead of focusing on his own expectations. A satisfied employee is easy to handle as compared to the unsatisfied one who might offer poor service to clients.

List of References

Craig, HK 2002, “Assess your aptitude, mindset, potential,” Contractor, Vol. 49, no, 9, pp 88-102.

Friedlein, A 2001, Web Project Management, Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, New York.

Hartman, F & Ashrafi, RA 2002, “Project management in the information systems and information technologies industries,” Project Management Journal, Vol. 33, no. 3, pp 5-15.

Hoffer, JA 2002, Modern Systems Analysis & Design, Pearson Education, Prentice Hall.