Using Violence to Discipline Children

Introduction

In the course of social evolution and globalization, nations form a consensus that certain practices can no longer be acceptable. An example of such practices is using violence to discipline children. Much progress has been made to end violence as a form of correction among children. Those who oppose using violence to discipline children argue that this form of correction is equivalent to abuse that might inflict physical and psychological pain in the victim at childhood and in adulthood (Talbot 13).

Why I want to write about using violence to discipline children

I want to write about this topic because it has attracted heated debate from the antagonists and protagonists of using violence to discipline children. The debate is on the counterproductive consequences such as physical and psychological injuries that are beyond disciplinary intentions. Besides, I need to establish the possible effects of prolonged use of violence to discipline children.

My interest in finding true answer

I am interested in finding a true answer to the research question because many parents still practice violent means of disciplining their children. For instance, many cases of using excessive force to punish children have been reported in the form of child abuse, and sometimes serious injuries.

People that might have a stake in the research

The people that might have a stake in my research project are stakeholders in the field of child protection such as parents, teachers, and other experts in childcare since they influence policies that might legalize or illegalize using violence to discipline children. Besides, child welfare regulators may use the research findings to design policies to protect children (Talbot 19).

Child welfare regulations are fundamental in guaranteeing the protection of the rights of children across the US. These regulations are significant towards proactive and sustainable children’s welfare management since they revolve around basic fundamental rights of children, provision of a safe environment, and serving other interests of the under-aged (Talbot 28).

Additional smaller questions

The smaller questions that might help to answer the research question are summarized below.

  1. What is the general perception of using violence to discipline children in American society?
  2. What are the views of the protagonists of using violence to discipline children in American society?
  3. What are the views of the antagonists of using violence to discipline children in American society?
  4. Why has the topic of using violence to discipline children attracted heated debate across the globe?

Beliefs, assumptions, preoccupations, ideas, and prejudices in the project

Reasons against using violence to discipline children

Basic human rights as the foundation for abolition: Using violence to discipline children should be eliminated since it is an infringement of basic human rights. The abolitionists argue that using violence to discipline children inflicts physical and psychological pain that might affect their wellbeing and socialization skills in adulthood. They further note that using violence to discipline children in American society violates the right to protection from physical abuse as stipulated in the constitution (Talbot 34).

Human dignity and self-respect: Human being has the dignity to exist with self-respect, which should be a key priority for any parent, teacher, or guardian in disciplining children. There has been a big concern how using violence to discipline children would tread on their dignity and right. Using violence to discipline children never gives a victim the possibility to be regretful of his or her actions since it instills trauma in the minds of the young children.

Besides, there is no tangible proof that using violence to discipline children in American society has been capable of preventing latent victims from performing offensive acts in the future.

Thus, mitigating violence to discipline children as a way to prevent future offensive acts is likely to be an obvious one-dimension justification that might not be right. This should not be the case. Actually, parents, teachers, and guardians who use violence to discipline children should look for objective justifications that support the illegal act, rather than their personal prejudices (Talbot 33).

Reasons supporting using violence to discipline children

Deterrence: On the other hand, the proponents of using violence to discipline children argue that it acts as a deterrence to would-be offenders and minimize chances of repeat offense since it instills fear in the minds of the young ones. Actually, before committing negative acts, children who are afraid of violent disciplinary actions have to perceive possible impacts of their actions because they are aware of what might follow.

Societies from traditional to contemporary have used violence to discipline children to discourage those who would-be offenders from committing the same act. The argument is that when a child is subjected to violent disciplinary action, would-be offenders among his or her peers will have to think over and over before committing the act for fear of being subjected to the same punishment (Talbot 28).

As opined by the supporters of using violence to discipline a child, the act is cost-valuable since it is a retribution action in which a victim is subjected to a disciplinary action that instills fear of being a repeat offender.

Experiences and personal reflection

Before carrying out the research on using violence to discipline children in American society, I held the personal belief that it is not right. This belief was informed by my belief that any disciplinary action should not inflict physical and psychological injury, especially to young children, since they might be traumatized for the rest of their lives.

Before developing knowledge on the topic, I was thinking of the underlying arguments that are applied in supporting using violence to discipline children in American society (Talbot 39). After the research, I am thinking that using violence to discipline children should be abolished since arguments for violent disciplinary actions do not justify the commission of punishment, particularly on minors.

Lessons from preliminary research and conversations that exist

From the preliminary research, I have learned that using violence to discipline children in American society is still common, despite being illegal. Though many parents may argue that violent disciplinary actions are regulated and controlled to minimize physical injury, their effects on the victims are traumatizing.

For instance, a child who is subjected to violent disciplinary action and gets injured may live with the fear and trauma for the rest of his or her life. In this case, the initial intention of using violence to discipline the minor might turn counterproductive (Talbot 13). Therefore, using violence to discipline children in American society should be abolished since it does not serve the purpose of correcting the minors, especially when it leads to physical and psychological injuries.

Works Cited

Talbot, James. The Road to Positive Discipline: A Parent’s Guide, Alabama, Al: The Rosen Publishing Group, 2010. Print.